Dried Scallop Rice Soup

Dried Scallop Rice Soup

I don’t know about you but I like eating soup as it is my all-time favorite comfort food.  When I saw Maangchi making this abalone porridge, it reminded me of the similar rice soup I made often in the distant past using fresh seafood (scallop & shrimp) and white fish and very occasionally with chicken.  Maangchi’s recipe inspires me to take this familiar dish dressing it up with Korean flavour (sesame oil and roasted seaweed nori)  and sends me on a search for some fish to be the main flavour of the soup.

Upon reading about dried scallop I decide to use it because I think this salted version of scallop would impart a lot of taste to the soup.  And I was right for this soup packs a wallop of umami from the scallop alone. You wouldn’t need to season it with anything else but I recommend a bit of fish sauce which enhances the already flavorful soup with yet another complex umami.  If you like me, a pinch of sea salt would tight everything together but it is not necessary as the broth has plenty of salt from the dried fish and fish sauce.

I thought the use of diced carrot is brilliant for it brightens up the mostly white soup and nicely contrasts the bright and dark green color of spring onion and seaweed.  I love fresh ginger so use it generously in my version of the recipe.

I won’t describe how it good tastes but I tell you this:  it is food for the soul and feast for the eyes.  So good so that when I offered some to friends they came back asking for more and wanted to learn how to make it.  Go ahead make some and discover it for yourself.  It freezes well only if there would be any leftover.

Let’s make the soup, shall we.

Ingredients:

100 g dried scallop, no color-dyed &  preservatives

1 heaping Cup uncooked rice **

2 Liters spring or filtered water

minced garlic

1-2 inches fresh ginger, julienned or coarsely chopped

1 small carrot, diced

2 Tablespoons sesame oil, preferred roasted kind

1 to 2 teaspoons fish sauce

sea salt as needed

https://i2.wp.com/farm5.static.flickr.com/4134/4908894959_94d5d90387_z.jpg

soaked dried scallop and soaked rice

Garnish:

green onion, thinly sliced — highly recommended

Korean roasted seaweed seasoned with sesame oil  —  an absolute must-have

Shichimi, Japanese 7-spice hot pepper

garlic chili sauce

** I use Haiga rice or Japanese short-grain rice.  If you use other type of rice, add an extra 1 to 2 Tablespoons of glutinous rice (sticky rice).

I do not rinse Haiga rice but other types of rice.


Method:

1. Soak rice and scallop separately in water, for at least 2 hours before cooking.

soaked dried scallop and soaked rice

Soaked Scallop & Rice in Water

2.  Prepare garlic, ginger and carrot.

Prep garlic, ginger & carrot

Prep garlic, ginger & carrot

3.  Drain the rice and scallop, reserve the soaking liquid.   Add more water to measure 1.5 liter or about 6 ¼ cups.

prep all ingredients before cooking

prep all ingredients before cooking

4.  Preheat a large soup pot over medium heat.  Add the sesame oil, ginger, garlic, carrot and sauté for 1 to 2 minutes.  Do not brown the garlic.

Sauté the herbs and carrot

Sauté the herbs and carrot in sesame oil

5.  Add the scallop and rice.  Continue sautéing to well coat the rice with oil.

Sauté all ingredients

Sauté all ingredients

6.  Continue stirring and cooking until the rice grains look translucent, about 5 to 7 more minutes.

the well sautéed ingredients just before adding liquid

the well sautéed ingredients just before adding liquid

7.  Add the measured liquid to the pot.  Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to simmer.  Cover the pot with a lid.

adding liquid

adding liquid

8.   Cook until the rice is well expanded, about 50 to 60  minutes; stirring occasionally.

9.  In the meantime, prepare the green onion and wash the dishes.  Crumble the seasoned roasted seaweed in a plastic bag.

chopped green onion

chopped green onion

10.  Add the fish sauce.  Add more water to thinning the soup if it’s too thick for your taste.

11.  Season with sea salt only if necessary and cook for about 5 more minutes.  The soup should have a creamy consistency by now.

12.  Turn off the heat.  Ladle the soup in a bowl and garnish with the condiments.

Soup with the condiments

Soup with the condiments

13.  Enjoy.

Enjoy the hearty tasty soup

Enjoy the hearty tasty soup

I particularly enjoy this soup with an egg simmering slowly in a serving portion to poach its white and yolk to a softness perfection.   Heavenly!

Poaching an egg in a serving-portion soup

Poaching an egg in a serving-portion soup

In a spicier version with a quarter teaspoon of garlic chili sauce.  Yummy spicy!

And those tender pieces of scallop just melt as soon as they touch your tongue.  I can’t get enough of this soup.  Addictive!

Tender scallop rice soup

Tender scallop rice soup

Quinoa Pilaf

30/07/2010

quinoa pilaf with roasted pecan

cooked quinoa pilaf with roasted pecan

There are many ways to prepare quinoa, which I have eaten for years and it has recently become trendy, as a one-dish meal, a side dish or can be used in a creative salad.

Cooked quinoa takes on flavour of any dish it is served with, very well.  It is fluffier than rice once cooked and packs a powerful 20 percent of complete amino acids, the most of any grains & seeds.

As long as I prepare it as a side dish as in place of rice,  I like the ratio 1 part quinoa:1.5 part  liquid;  anything else thrown in is a bonus.

Here is one simple way that I often prepare and serve it as a side dish which many friends have enjoyed.  You can easily double or triple this recipe.

Quinoa pilaf

4 servings, as a side dish.

Ingredients:

1 cup quinoa, well washed & drained

1.5 cup hot liquid, water/full-strength vegetable broth/well-diluted chicken broth

.5 medium-size white onion, chopped

a bunch of curly parsley, washed & finely chopped

(green onion works well, green and white part, thinly chopped)

a hand full roasted nuts, chopped pecan/chopped walnut/whole pine nuts

1 Tablespoon of olive oil

salt to taste

special equipment: a fine mesh sieve/strainer

Method:

1. Thoroughly wash the quinoa using a fine mesh sieve, set aside to dry, at least 20 minutes before cooking.

2. Wash the herb, set aside to dry.  Roast the nuts, set aside to cool.  Heat the liquid in a microwave or let it simmer over a stove top.

3. Chopped the onion.

4. Sauté onion in olive oil in a heavy bottom pot over medium high heat  until the onion well coated and slightly soften, a few minutes.

5. Mix in the prepared quinoa,  and sauté until a nutty aroma comes out, about 5 minutes.

sautéing quinoa and chopped white onion in olive oil

sautéing quinoa and chopped white onion in olive oil

6. Carefully pour in the prepared liquid for it might splash.  Bring it to a boil then turn down the heat and let it simmer, well covered.

You might want to season it lightly with sea salt at this point, to your taste.  Let it simmer for about 20-25 minutes.

7. In the meantime, chop the herb & the roasted nut.

8. Throw in the chopped herb in the last 5 minutes of cooking and put the cover back on.  If you use fresh cilantro, mix it in at the last-minute just before serving.

9. Turn off the heat.  Leave it cover for 5 minutes more or so.

10.  Mix in half the nut and fluff the quinoa with a fork.  Serve immediately or cover to keep warm and serve later.  Pass the rest of the nut around the table.  Season with if necessary.

cooked quinoa adorned with chopped parsley & roasted walnuts

cooked quinoa adorned with chopped parsley & roasted walnuts

Here is a close-up of another batch of quinoa pilaf prepared at my friend Alice’s using the antique pot passed down from her late mother:

quinoa pilaf with roasted walnuts

quinoa pilaf with roasted walnuts

As with any cooked grains leftover stored in the fridge tends to become hard so it’s no different with quinoa.  Just reheat it slowly in a microwave at low-powered setting for a few minutes to bring it back to taste.  You can even mix in a teaspoon or two of water to moisten if it seemed too hard.

I had wonderful leftover quinoa with a fried egg mixed in turning it to a delicious one-dish meal.  On occasions I brought it out to room temperature and added it in a green salad.  Once I put leftover in a clear soup to give the soup some body and added flavour.  The variation is endless.

Enjoy this quinoa pilaf with cilantro served alongside roasted Meyer lemon chicken and sautéed baby spinach.

quinoa pilaf served as side dish with roasted Meyer chicken & sautéed baby spinach

quinoa pilaf served as side dish with roasted Meyer lemon chicken & sautéed baby spinach

Until I figure it out how tiled-picture link works properly, please go to the following links for the recipes and methods:

Gluten-Free Millet and Amaranth Crusted Artisan Bread,

Gluten-Free Hearty Seeded Bread (updated), and

Gluten-Free Blueberry Bread (yummy!)

This is a short post to summarise the gluten-free bread baking spree we went wild last weekend that spanned way into Passover: a total of 4-day baking resulted in 4 beautiful loaves of 3 different types of bread.  Yes, I said bread, gluten-free bread, to be exact and it’s important for those who could not or no longer be able to consume wheat-based baked goods/bread.

It’s too bad we could not offer these de.li.ci.ous at the Passover Seder’s diner where only unleavened bread are eaten.

I was new and after baking 4 loaves I am still new but have learned a lot in this Terra incognita of bread baking.  I had a blast and gained a little bit confidence as such I know I can handle gluten-free bread.  However,  I do not understand the science behind all the ingredients that participated in the breads nor the leavening that we used.

I am just beginning to discover and already yearning for more.  Please chime in to share your experiences in gluten-free breads that you have made in your own kitchen.  I would like to learn more about it, trials and errors and success from you.  Thank you.

I am pleased to send this over to share with the folks at Yeast Spotting.  After all, that was where I first learned about gluten-free bread.   Happy baking gluten-free bread.  ;o)

gluten-free hearty seeded bread

gluten-free hearty seeded bread, crumb & crust

Quest for gluten-free bread has been on my mind for almost a month and without baking any bread for over 3 weeks, I was more than anxious when I saw this recipe, –its loaf is in every way looks like bread to me–posted on last week’s Yeast Spotting.   I went to The Sourdough BBB site put in a comment that I would bake it very soon.   I mentioned to Alice about it but she decided to have this bread made first instead and so we did it on Saturday evening.

That  same evening I could not wait any longer so just before mid-night I mixed the dough for this bread –which I have been looking forward to, to use my newly favorite seed: chia seeds— stuck the mixed dough in the fridge for a short cold fermentation (about 3.5 hours) and then let it finish its first rise on the counter and followed the original recipe to bake it the next day on Sunday evening.  It’s well worth the wait and the small fortune I spent invested in the gluten-free ingredients purchased at the local Whole Foods market –which by the way was an educational and fun trip at the store–.

gluten-free ingredients

gluten-free ingredients

I have most but not all of the requested ingredients so I am going to post the ingredients I use for this particular loaf  because my friend Alice’s request it so that she can make it herself.  After all, my quest for gluten-free bread is for Alice, who has been diligently consuming wheat-free foods the past few months when she was diagnosed with gluten allergy but not celiac.

This recipe is closely based on the recipe posted by The Sourdough’s breadchick, who got it from Gluten-free No Knead Hearty Seeded Sandwich Bread by Nancy Baggett’s “Kneadlessly Simple”.

I will note my adaptions marked with ** and guide with lots of pictures since this is my first gluten-free sandwich-type loaf and  there are several people already interested in this particular loaf and waiting for its recipe.

Let bake some gluten-free bread, shall we?

The Dry Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 Cup brow rice flour plus 2/3 Cup corn flour **
  • 1/2 Cup corn flour (added 3 Tablespoons more to thicken the batter/dough at mixing) **
  • 1/2 Cup cornstarch
  • 1/3 Cup tapioca flour
  • 1/3 Cup roasted golden flax seed **
  • 1 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp instant yeast
  • 3 Tablespoon of mixed seeds (I used fox tail millet grain, roasted golden flax seed & chia seed) **

The Wet Ingredients:

  • 1 1/3 Cup ice water plus 2 Tablespoons
  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 1/4 Cup agave nectar **

Egg-Yogurt-Rice Flour Mixture :

  • 1 medium-size egg, at room temperature, lightly mixed
  • 1/4 Cup plain Greek-style yogurt (if use thin yogurt, drain of excess liquid)
  • 2/3 Cup Asian Rice Flour **
  • 2 1/2 tsp baking powder

Topping:

  • 1 Tablespoon of mixed seeds (1 teaspoon each: fox tail millet, chia seed, roasted golden flax seed)
  • 1 Tablespoon of reserved mixed egg (from above) for egg wash

Method:

First Rise: Mix the dry ingredients in a large bowl.

dry ingredients mixture

dry ingredients mixture

Mix the wet ingredients in another bowl.  Mix the two together thoroughly.

the mixed dough

the mixed dough

Add more water if it is too stiff, or more rice/corn flour if it is too soft to form a barely firm dough.  I already accounted for all the added flour in the recipe.  Tightly cover the bowl with plastic wrap.  For best flavor, refrigerated dough for 3  to 10 hours.  I took mine out of the fridge after 3.5 hours.   Let stand at cool room temperature for 12 to 18 hours.  Mine took 14.5 hours to rise up quite a bit.

dough after cold fermentation and first rise

dough after cold fermentation and first rise

Sunday morning I woke up went to the gym for a short and light workout and headed out for a medium-long walk at the Shoreline Park with my buddy Nate in the early afternoon.  We got home, had a light super of chicken kayu and slices of the first gluten-free crusted artisan loaf baked yesterday with Kerrygold butter.  Nate biked to go home just before it got dark.  I had more than enough time to clean up, took  a shower and leisurely started preparing the dough for its second rise.  This recipe is so adaptable to your own schedule.

I tasted the dough and it was already had a slight sour taste after being fermented slowly over 14 hours so I decided to go ahead and mix in the rest of the rest.  Up to this point I had a very good feeling about this bread.  Yummy!  The extra corn flour I used must have given a yellow hue to the dough dotted with darker shade of millet grains and golden flax seed.  It’s pretty!

Second Rise: Stir the yogurt, baking powder, and 1/3 Cup white rice flour into the remaining egg.

egg-yogurt-rice-flour mixture

egg-yogurt-rice-flour mixture

Stir vigorously into the First Rise dough until completely mixed.  If it is too soft, you can add more rice flour.  Turn the dough into a well greased 9 inch x 5 inch loaf pan and brush a little oil on top of the loaf.

well-greased pan, enough, no?

well-greased pan, enough, no?

dough in prepared loaf pan

dough in prepared loaf pan

Brush the reserved egg and sprinkle seeds over the surface of the loaf.

egg wash & seed decoration

egg wash & seed decoration

Using a well oiled serrated knife, make a 1/2-inch deep cut lengthwise down the loaf.  Cover the pan with a lightly greased piece of saran wrap.

slash on top of dough

slash on top of dough

Tried as I could but the wet dough did not make it easy for me to slash it.  Oh well, we shall see.

Let dough rise in a warm place (I turn the appliance light on in the oven and stick it in there) unit it extends 1/8-inch above the pan’s rim, about 2 1/2 to 4 hours.  Mine took 2 1/4 hours.  By now the dough was well risen, bubbly and you can hear some sound made by air bubbles popped up.

well risen loaf ready to be baked

well risen loaf ready to be baked

Loosen the plastic wrap as dough nears top of pan to prevent dough from swooshing down, says the original recipe but I did not need to because I greased the saran wrap quite well and it helped.

Baking: 15 minutes before baking, place a rack in the lower third of the oven and pre-heat to 375º F.  Bake bread for 55-60 minutes, until the top is nicely browned.  Continue to bake until a test insert comes out with a few crumbs or the internal temperature registers 206-208 degrees.  Bake for 5 minutes more.  Remove bread from the oven and leave the loaf still in pan, on wire rack for 15 minutes.  Loosen the loaf from the corner and remove from the pan.

Let cool completely before slicing. 

In less than 24 hours from start to finish, we got bread, not just any bread but gluten-free bread that looks beautiful, smells wonderful and tastes?  you will have to wait for the loaf to cool off before we can cut into slices.  But here is the baked loaf, voilà:

the baked loaf

the baked loaf

Alice likes the bread very much and said that it’s the most delicious seeded bread she has ever tasted.  That’s all counted for.  What joy to see my friend being able to enjoy bread again without being sick from eating it.  My quest is fulfilled, goal met and mission is accomplished.

gluten-free hearty seeded bread slices

gluten-free hearty seeded bread slices

This is bread I tell you:  golden scrumptious crust;  moist, airy, tasty seeded crumb which is tinted by yellow Corn Flour and different hues from the 3 kinds of seeds.  Can’t take my eyes of the crust color and beautiful crumb.

Simplemente  De.li.ci.o.so con Mantequilla!

Updated: on Monday night 29th March, I decided to make another loaf of the same bread, using the exact amount of brown rice flour called for in the original recipe and let Alice take care of the rest while I would go home.

2 days later, second loaf

2 days later, second loaf

It did happened, everything except that I did not go home yet but stayed over to participate in today’s Passover Seder & dinner tomorrow evening.  We shortened the First Rise to only 4 or at most 5 hours (in a warm oven) to see if it would compromise the taste.  It rose nicely the first 4 hours and then started to sink down.  We prepared for the bake just a little bit after noon to get it out the way before the dinner preparation kicked in.

prep gluten-free seeded bread

prep gluten-free seeded bread

decorating seeds on top of loaf

decorating seeds on top of loaf

The loaf rose and fell but the outcome is still delicious just like the first loaf.

the baked loaf

the baked loaf

I hope you will give this bread a try.  To my bread palate, the bread taste like crumbly tasty cake.  But it tastes good enough that I had it for breakfast (read: more like lunch) twice in a row:

breakfast II

breakfast II

breakfast II

breakfast I

Enjoy baking gluten-free bread!